background image

 

Aminoglycosides

       

     

.

  

   are  used  for  the  treatment  of  serious  infections  due  to aerobic  gram-negative 
bacilli.  However,  their  clinical  utility  is  limited  by  serious toxicities.  The  term 
―aminoglycoside‖  stems  from  their  structure—two amino  sugars  joined  by  a 
glycosidic  linkage  to  a  central  hexose  nucleus. Aminoglycosides  are  derived 
from either Streptomyces sp. (have –mycin suffixes) or Micromonospora sp. 
 
 Mechanism  of  action Aminoglycosides  diffuse  through  porin  channels  in  the 
outer 

membrane of 

susceptible 

organisms. Antibiotics 

that 

disrupt protein 

synthesis 

are 

generally 

bacteriostatic, 

however 

aminoglycosides 

may 

be 

bactericidal  against  some  microorganisms. The  aminoglycosides  are  effective 
for  the  majority  of  aerobic  gram negative bacilli,  including  those  that  may  be 
multidrug  resistant, such  as  Pseudomonas  aeruginosa,  Klebsiella  pneumoniae, 
and Enterobacter sp. 
 
Absorption:  The  highly  polar,  polycationic  structure  of  the  aminoglycosides 
prevents  adequate  absorption  after  oral  administration.  It  is  administered 
topically  for  skin  infections  or  orally  for  bowel  preparation.  More  than  90%  of 
the parenteral aminoglycosides are excreted unchanged in the urine. 
 
Adverse effects 
Therapeutic  drug  monitoring  of  gentamicin,  tobramycin,  and  amikacin  plasma 
levels  is  imperative  to  ensure  adequacy  of  dosing  and  to  minimize  dose-related 
toxicities.The 

elderly 

are 

particularly 

susceptible 

to 

nephrotoxicity 

and 

ototoxicity. 
 1.  Ototoxicity:  Ototoxicity  (vestibular  and  auditory)  is  directly  related  to  high 
peak  plasma  levels  and  the  duration  of  treatment.  The  antibiotic  accumulates  in 
the  endolymph  and  perilymph  of  the  inner  ear.  Deafness  may  be  irreversible  and 
has  been  known  to  affect  developing  fetuses.  Patients  simultaneously  receiving 
concomitant  ototoxic  drugs,  such  as  cisplatin  or  loop  diuretics,  are  particularly 
at risk. Vertigo (especially in patients receiving streptomycin) may also occur. 
2.  Nephrotoxicity:  Retention  of  the  aminoglycosides  by  the  proximal  tubular 
cells  disrupts  calcium-mediated  transport  processes.  This  results  in  kidney 
damage  ranging  from  mild,  reversible  renal  impairment  to  severe,  potentially 
irreversible, acute tubular necrosis. 
3.  Neuromuscular  paralysis:  This  adverse  effect  is  associated  with  a  rapid 
increase  in  concentrations  (for  example,  high  doses  infused  over  a  short  period.) 
or 

concurrent 

administration 

with 

neuromuscular 

blockers. 

Patients 

with 

myasthenia  gravis  are  particularly  at  risk.  Prompt  administration  of  calcium 


background image

 

gluconate  or  neostigmine  can  reverse  the  block  that  causes  neuromuscular 
paralysis. 
4.  Allergic  reactions:  Contact  dermatitis  is  a  common  reaction  to  topically 
applied neomycin. 
 
Spectinomycin 
Spectinomycin  is  an  aminocyclitol  antibiotic  that  is  structurally  related  to 
aminoglycosides.  It  lacks  amino  sugars  and  glycosidic  bonds.  spectinomycin  is 
used  almost  solely  as  an  alternative  treatment  for  gonorrohea  in  patients  who  are 
allergic  to  penicillin  or  whose  gonococci  are  resistant  to  other  drugs.  Strains  of 
gonococci  may  be  resistant  to  spectinomycin,  but  there  is  no  cross-resistance 
with  other  drugs  used  in  gonorrhea.  Spectinomycin  is  rapidly  absorbed  after 
intramuscular  injection.  Side  effects  (  pain  at  the  injection  site  ,  fever  ,  nausea, 
nephrotoxicity and anemia ). 

 

***************************************************** 
TETRACYCLINES 
Tetracyclines  consist  of  four  fused  rings  with  a  system  of  conjugated  double 
bonds.  Substitutions  on  these  rings  alter  the  individual  pharmacokinetics  and 
spectrum of antimicrobial activity. 
A. Mechanism of action 
Tetracyclines  enter  susceptible  organisms  via  passive  diffusion  and  also  by  an 
energy-dependent 

transport 

protein 

mechanism 

to 

the 

inner 

bacterial 

cytoplasmic  membrane.  Tetracyclines  concentrate  intracellularly  in  susceptible 
organisms.  The  drugs  bind  reversibly  to  the  bacterial  ribosome.  This  action 
prevents  binding  of  tRNA  to  the  mRNA–ribosome  complex,  thereby  inhibiting 
bacterial protein synthesis. 
 
B. Antibacterial spectrum 
The  tetracyclines  are  bacteriostatic  antibiotics  effective  against  a  wide  variety  of 
organisms, 

including 

gram-positive 

and 

gram-negative 

bacteria, 

protozoa, 

spirochetes,  mycobacteria,  and  atypical  species.  They  are  commonly  used  in  the 
treatment of acne and Chlamydia infections (doxycycline). 
 
D. Pharmacokinetics 
1.  Absorption:  
Tetracyclines  are  adequately  absorbed  after  oral  ingestion  . 
Administration  with  dairy  products  or  other  substances  that  contain  divalent  and 
trivalent  cations  (for  example,magnesium  and  aluminum  antacids  or  iron 
supplements)  decreases  absorption,  particularly  for  tetracycline    due  to  the 


background image

 

formation  of  nonabsorbable  chelates  .  Both  doxycycline  and  minocycline  are 
available as oral and intravenous (IV) preparations. 
2.  Distribution:  The  tetracyclines  concentrate  well  in  the  bile,  liver,  kidney, 
gingival  fluid,  and  skin.  Moreover,  they  bind  to  tissues  undergoing  calcification 
(for  example,  teeth  and  bones)  or  to  tumors  that  have  a  high  calcium  content. 
Penetration 

into 

most 

body 

fluids 

is 

adequate. 

Only 

minocycline 

and 

doxycycline 

achieve 

therapeutic 

levels 

in 

the 

cerebrospinal 

fluid 

(CSF). 

Minocycline  also  achieves  high  levels  in  saliva  and  tears,  rendering  it  useful  in 
eradicating  the  meningococcal  carrier  state.  All  tetracyclines  cross  the  placental 
barrier and concentrate in fetal bones and dentition. 
3.  Elimination:  Tetracycline  and  doxycycline  are  not  hepatically  metabolized. 
Tetracycline  is  primarily  eliminated  unchanged  in  th  urine,  whereas  minocycline 
undergoes  hepatic  metabolism  and  is  eliminated  to  a  lesser  extent  via  the 
kidney.  In  renally  compromised  patients,  doxycycline  is  preferred,  as  it  is 
primarily eliminated via the bile into the feces.   
 
E. Adverse effects 
1.  Gastric  discomfort:  
Epigastric  distress  commonly  results  from  irritation  of 
the  gastric  mucosa    and  is  often  responsible  for  noncompliance  with 
tetracyclines.  Esophagitis  may  be  minimized  through  coadministration  with 
food  (other  than  dairy products)  or  fluids  and  the  use  of  capsules  rather  than 
tablets. [Note: Tetracycline should be taken on an empty stomach.] 
2.  Effects  on  calcified  tissues:  Deposition  in  the  bone  and  primary dentition 
occurs  during  the  calcification  process  in  growing  children.  This  may  cause 
discoloration  and  hypoplasia  of  teeth  and  a  temporary stunting  of  growth.  The 
use of tetracyclines is limited in pediatrics. 
3. 

Hepatotoxicity: 

Rarely 

hepatotoxicity 

may 

occur 

with 

high 

doses, 

particularly  in  pregnant  women  and  those  with  preexisting  hepatic dysfunction 
or renal impairment. 
4.  Phototoxicity:  Severe  sunburn  may  occur  in  patients  receiving  a tetracycline 
who  are  exposed  to  sun  or  ultraviolet  rays.  This  toxicity  is  encountered  with  any 
tetracycline,  but  more  frequently  with  tetracycline  and  demeclocycline  .Patients 
should be advised to wear adequate sun protection. 
5. 

Vestibular 

dysfunction: 

Dizziness, 

vertigo, 

and 

tinnitus 

may 

occur  

particularly  with  minocycline,  which  concentrates  in  the  endolymph  of  the  ear 
and affects function. Doxycycline may also cause vestibular dysfunction. 
6.  Pseudotumor  cerebri:  Benign,  intracranial  hypertension  characterized  by 
headache 

and 

blurred 

vision 

may 

occur 

rarely 

in 

adults. 

Although 


background image

 

discontinuation  of  the  drug  reverses  this  condition,  it  is  not  clear  whether 
permanent sequelae may occur. 
7.  Contraindications:  The  tetracyclines  should  not  be  used  in  pregnant  or 
breast-feeding women or in children less than 8 years of age. 

===================================================================================================== 

MACROLIDES AND KETOLIDES                                                                 
The macrolides are a group of antibiotics with a macrocyclic lactone structure to which one or more 
deoxy sugars are attached. Erythromycin  was the first of these drugs to find clinical application, both 
as a drug of first choice and as an alternative to penicillin in individuals with an allergy to β-lactam 
antibiotics.  Clarithromycin  (a  methylated  form  of  erythromycin)  and  azithromycin (having  a  larger 
lactone  ring)  have    some  features  in common  with,  and  others  that  improve  upon,  erythromycin. 
Telithromycin

 

a semisynthetic derivative of  erythromycin, is the first ―ketolide‖ antimicrobial agent. 

Ketolides  and  macrolides  have  similar antimicrobial  coverage.  However,  the  ketolides  are  active 
against many macrolide-resistant gram-positive strains. 
 
Mechanism of action 
The macrolides bind irreversibly to the bacterial ribosome, thus inhibiting protein synthesis. Generally 
considered to be bacteriostatic, they may be bactericidal at higher doses. 
 
Antibacterial spectrum 
1.  Erythromycin:  This  drug  is  effective  against  many  of  the  same organisms  as  penicillin  G 
.Therefore, it may be used in patients with penicillin allergy. 
2.  Clarithromycin:  Clarithromycin  has  activity  similar  to  erythromycin,

 

but  it  is  also  effective 

against  Haemophilus  influenzae.  Its  activity

 

against  intracellular  pathogens,  such  as  Chlamydia

Legionella,

 

Moraxella,  Ureaplasma  species  and  Helicobacter  pylori,  is  higher

 

than  that  of 

erythromycin. 
3.  Azithromycin:  Although  less  active  against  streptococci  and  staphylococci than  erythromycin, 
azithromycin  
is  far  more  active  against respiratory  infections  due  to  H.  influenzae  and  Moraxella 
catarrhalis.  
4. Telithromycin: This drug has an antimicrobial spectrum similar to that of azithromycin. 
 
 
Pharmacokinetics 
1.  Administration:  The  erythromycin  base  is  destroyed  by  gastric acid.  Thus,  either  enteric-coated 
tablets or esterified forms of the antibiotic are administered. All are adequately absorbed upon oral 
administration  .  Clarithromycin, azithromycin,  and telithromycin  are  stable  in  stomach  acid  and  are 
readily absorbed. Erythromycin and azithromycin are available in IV formulations. 
2. Distribution: Erythromycin distributes well to all body fluids except the CSF. It is one of the few 
antibiotics that  diffuses  into  prostatic fluid, and  it  also  accumulates  in  macrophages. All  four  drugs 
concentrate in the liver. Clarithromycin, azithromycin, and telithromycin are widely distributed in the 
tissues. Azithromycin concentrates in neutrophils, macrophages, and fibroblasts, and serum levels are 
low. It has the longest half-life and the largest volume of distribution of the four drugs . 


background image

 

3. Excretion:  Erythromycin  and  azithromycin  are  primarily  concentrated and  excreted  in  the  bile  as 
active  drugs  . Partial  reabsorption  occurs  through  the  enterohepatic  circulation. In  contrast, 
clarithromycin and its metabolites are eliminated by the kidney as well as the liver. The dosage of this 
drug should be adjusted in patients with renal impairment. 
Adverse effects 
1.  Gastric  distress  and  motility:  Gastric  upset  is  the  most  common adverse  effect  of  the  macrolides 
and  may  lead  to  poor  patient  compliance (especially  with  erythromycin).  Clarithromycin  and 
azithromycin  seem  to  be  better  tolerated  .  Higher doses  of  erythromycin  lead  to  smooth  muscle 
contractions  that result  in  the  movement  of  gastric  contents  to  the  duodenum,  an adverse  effect 
sometimes used therapeutically for the treatment of gastroparesis or postoperative ileus. 
2.  Cholestatic  jaundice:  This  side  effect  occurs  especially  with  the estolate  form  (not  used  in  the 
United States) of erythromycin
3. Ototoxicity: Transient deafness has been associated with erythromycin,

 

especially at high dosages. 

Azithromycin has also been associated with irreversible sensorineural hearing loss. 
4.  Contraindications:  Patients  with  hepatic  dysfunction  should  be treated  cautiously  with 
erythromycin, telithromycin, or azithromycin, because these drugs accumulate in the liver.  
 
================================================================== 
CHLORAMPHENICOL 
The use of chloramphenicol a broad-spectrum antibiotic, is restricted to life-threatening infections for 
which no alternatives exist. 
 
Mechanism of action 
Chloramphenicol binds reversibly to the bacterial ribosom and inhibits protein synthesis. Due to some 
similarity of mammalian mitochondrial ribosomes to those of bacteria, protein and ATP synthesis in 
these organelles may be inhibited at high circulating chloramphenicol levels, producing bone marrow 
toxicity. [Note: The oral formulation of chloramphenicol was removed from the US market due to this 
toxicity.] 
 
Antibacterial spectrum 
Chloramphenicol  is  active against  many types  of microorganisms including  chlamydiae, rickettsiae, 
spirochetes,  and  anaerobes.  The  drug is  primarily  bacteriostatic,  but  depending  on  the  dose  and 
organism, it may be bactericidal. 
 
Pharmacokinetics 
Chloramphenicol  is  administered  intravenously  and  is  widely  distributed throughout  the  body.  It 
reaches  therapeutic  concentrations  in  the CSF.  Chloramphenicol  primarily  undergoes  hepatic 
metabolism  (glucuronidation)  and  secreted  by  the  renal  tubule  and  eliminated in  the  urine.  Dose 
reductions are necessary in patients with liver dysfunction or cirrhosis. It is also secreted into breast 
milk and should be avoided in breast feeding mothers. 
 
 
 
 


background image

 

Adverse effects 
1.  Anemias:  Patients  may  experience  dose-related  anemia,  hemolytic anemia  (seen  in  patients  with 
glucose-6-phosphate  dehydrogenase deficiency),  and  aplastic  anemia.  [Note:  Aplastic  anemia  is 
independent of dose and may occur after therapy has ceased.] 
2. Gray baby syndrome: Neonates have a low capacity to glucuronidate the antibiotic, and they have 
underdeveloped  renal  function. Therefore,  neonates  have  a  decreased  ability  to  excrete  the drug, 
which accumulates to levels that interfere with the function of mitochondrial ribosomes. This leads to 
poor  feeding,  depressed breathing,  cardiovascular  collapse,  cyanosis  (hence  the  term  ―gray baby‖), 
and death. Adults who have received very high doses of the drug can also exhibit this toxicity. 
3.  Drug  interactions:  Chloramphenicol  inhibits  some  of  the  hepatic mixed-function  oxidases  and, 
thus,  blocks  the  metabolism  of  drugs such  as  warfarin  and  phenytoin,  thereby  elevating  their 
concentrations and potentiating their effects. 
 
 

 

CLINDAMYCIN 
Clindamycin  has a mechanism of action that is the same as that of erythromycin. Clindamycin is used 
primarily  in  the  treatment of  infections  caused  by  gram-positive  organisms,  including  MRSA 
(methislin res. Staph.) and streptococcus, and anaerobic bacteria. Resistance mechanisms are the same 
as those for erythromycin, and cross-resistance has been described. C. difficile is always resistant to 
clindamycin,  and  the  utility  of clindamycin  for  gram-negative  anaerobes  (for  example,  Bacteroides 
sp.) is  decreasing  due  to  increasing  resistance.  Clindamycin  is  available  in both  IV  and  oral 
formulations, but use of the oral form is limited by gastrointestinal intolerance. It distributes well into 
all body fluids including bone,but exhibits poor entry into the CSF. Clindamycin undergoes extensive 
oxidative  metabolism  to  inactive  products  and  is  primarily  excreted  into  the  bile.  Low  urinary 
elimination limits its clinical utility for urinary tract infections . Accumulation has been reported  in 
patients with  either  severe  renal  impairment  or  hepatic  failure.  In  addition  to  skin rashes,  the  most 
common adverse effect is diarrhea, which may represent a serious pseudomembranous colitis caused 
by  overgrowth  of C.  difficile.  Oral  administration  of  either  metronidazole  or  vancomycin  is usually 
effective in the treatment of C. difficile. 
 
===================================================================== 

Antifolate

 

Drugs  Sulfonamides        ( 

Sulfacytine,  Sulfisoxazole,  Sulfamethizole,  Sulfadiazine, 

Sulfamethoxazole, Sulfapyridine, Sulfadoxine, Pyrimidines,

 

Trimethoprim).

 

Susceptible  microorganisms  require  extracellular  PABA(p-aminobenzoic  acid)  in  order  to 
form  dihydrofolic  acid      an  essential  step  in  the  production  of  purines  and  the  synthesis  of 
nucleic  acids.  Sulfonamides  are  structural  analogs  of  PABA  that  competitively  inhibit 
dihydropteroate synthase.  

 


background image

 

Sulfonamides  inhibit  both  gram-  positive  and  gram-negative  bacteria,  nocardia,  Chlamydia 
trachomatis,  
and  some  protozoa.  Some  enteric  bacteria,  such  as  E  coli,  klebsiella, 
salmonella, shigella, and enterobacter, are inhibited.  

Sulfonamides  can  be  divided  into  three  major  groups:  (1)  oral,  absorbable;  (2)  oral, 
nonabsorbable;  and  (3)  topical.  Sodium  salts  of  sulfonamides  in  5%  dextrose  in  water  can 
be  given  intravenously.  They  are  absorbed  from  the  stomach  and  small  intestine  and 
distributed  widely  to  tissues  and  body  fluids  (including  the  central  nervous  system  and 
cerebrospinal fluid), placenta, and fetus. Sulfonamides are excreted into the urine. 

Clinical Uses 
Oral Absorbable Agents 
1.urinary tract infections, sulfisoxazole or sulfamethoxazole. 
2.acute toxoplasmosis: Sulfadiazine with pyrimethamine .Folinic acid, should also be 
administered to minimize bone marrow suppression. 

 

Oral Nonabsorbable Agents 

Sulfasalazine is widely used in ulcerative colitis, enteritis, and other inflammatory bowel 
disease
.

 

 
Topical Agents 
1.Bacterial conjunctivitis and : Sodium sulfacetamide.  
2.Burn wounds : Silver sulfadiazine is a much less toxic topical sulfonamide and is used for 
prevention of infection of burn wounds. 
 

 

Adverse Reactions: 
fever, skin rashes, exfoliative dermatitis, photosensitivity, urticaria, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and 
difficulties referable to the urinary tract. Stevens-Johnson syndrome, potentially fatal type (eruption  
of   skin &  mucous membrean)in 1%. 

 

Trimethoprim & Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole Mixtures

 

Trimethoprim, inhibits bacterial dihydrofolic acid reductase leading to inhibition  of the synthesis of 
purines and ultimately to DNA. Trimethoprim & pyrimethamine, given together with sulfonamides, 
resulting in marked enhancement (synergism) of the activity of both drugs. The combination often is 
bactericidal, compared to the bacteriostatic activity of a sulfonamide alone. 
 
Pharmacokinetics 
Trimethoprim  is  usually  given  orally,  alone  or  in  combination  with  sulfamethoxazole,  the 
latter  chosen  because  it  has  a  similar  half-life.  Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole  can  also  be 
given  intravenously.  Trimethoprim  is  absorbed  efficiently  from  the  gut  and  distributed 
widely  in  body  fluids  and  tissues,  including  cerebrospinal  fluid,  sulfonamide  and  of  the 
trimethoprim  (or  their  respective  metabolites)  are  excreted  in  the  urine  within  24 
hours.Trimethoprim    concentrates  in  prostatic  fluid  and  in  vaginal  fluid,  which  are  more 


background image

 

acidic  than  plasma.  Therefore,  it  has  more  antibacterial  activity  in  prostatic  and  vaginal 
fluids than many other antimicrobial drugs. 
 
Clinical Uses 
a.Oral Trimethoprim 
Trimethoprim can be given alone in acute urinary tract infections
 
b.Oral Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole 
combination  of  trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole  (cotrimoxazole)is  effective  treatment  for 
pneumonia

shigellosis

systemic 

salmonella 

infections 

(caused 

by 

ampicillin- 

or 

chloramphenicol-resistant  organisms),  complicated  urinary  tract  infections,  prostatitis
some  nontuberculous  mycobacterial  infections,  ,  upper  respiratory  tract  infections 
and community-acquired bacterial  pneumonia.  
 
c.Intravenous Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole 
A  solution  of  the  mixture  containing  trimethoprim  plus  sulfamethoxazole  diluted  in  5% 
dextrose  in  water  can  be  administered  by  intravenous  infusion  s.  It  is  the  agent  of  choice 
for  moderately  severe  to  severe  pneumocystis  pneumonia,  gram-negative  bacterial 
sepsis
;  shigellosis;  typhoid  fever;  or  urinary  tract  infection  caused  by  a  susceptible 
organism when the patient is unable to take the drug by mouth.  
 
Adverse Effects 
megaloblastic  anemia,  leukopenia,  and  granulocytopenia.  This  can  be  prevented  by  the 
simultaneous  administration  of  folinic  acid.  In  addition,  the  combination  trimethoprim-
sulfamethoxazole  may  cause  all  of  the  untoward  reactions  associated  with  sulfonamides. 
Nausea  and  vomiting,  drug  fever,  vasculitis,  renal  damage,  and  central  nervous  system 
disturbances occasionally occur also. 
================================================================== 

DNA Gyrase Inhibitors 
Fluoroquinolones
   (Ciprofloxacin, Clinafloxacin, Enoxacin, Gatifloxacin, Levofloxacin, 
Lomefloxacin, Moxifloxacin, Norfloxacin, Ofloxacin, Sparfloxacin, Trovafloxacin).They 
are  active  against  a  variety  of  gram-positive  and  gram-negative  bacteria.  Quinolones 
block  bacterial  DNA  synthesis  by  inhibiting  bacterial  DNA  gyrase.  Inhibition  of  DNA 
gyrase prevents the normal transcription and replication. 
Pharmacokinetics 
After 

oral 

administration, 

the 

fluoroquinolones 

are 

well 

absorbed 

and 

distributed  widely  in  body  fluids  and  tissues.  Serum  half-lives  range  from  3 
hours  up  to  10.  The  relatively  long  half-lives  of  levofloxacin,  moxifloxacin, 
sparfloxacin, and trovafloxacin permit once-daily dosing. 
.  Most  fluoroquinolones  are  eliminated  by  renal  mechanisms,  either  tubular 
secretion  or  glomerular  filtration.  Nonrenally  cleared  fluoroquinolones  are 
contraindicated in patients with hepatic failure. 

 


background image

 

Clinical Uses 
1-urinary  tract  infections  Norfloxacin,  ciprofloxacin,  and  ofloxacin  given 
orally twice daily are all effective. 
2-bacterial diarrhea ( shigella, salmonella, toxigenic E coli, or campylobacter) 
3-  infections  of  soft  tissues,  bones,  and  joints  and  in  intra-abdominal  and 
respiratory  tract  infections
  Fluoroquinolones  (except  norfloxacin,  which  does 
not 

achieve 

adequate 

systemic 

concentrations) 

have 

been 

employed 

in, 

including  those  caused  by  multidrug-resistant  organisms  such  as  pseudomonas 
and enterobacter. 

  
4-gonococcal  infection: Ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin 
5-chlamydial urethritis or cervicitis ofloxacin is effective for. 
Owing  to  their  marginal  activity  against  the  pneumococcus,  fluoroquinolones 
have  not  been  routinely  recommended  for  empirical  treatment  of  pneumonia 
and other upper respiratory tract infections.  
 
Adverse Effect 
Fluoroquinolones  are  extremely  well  tolerated.  The  most  common  effects  are 
nausea,  vomiting,  and  diarrhea.  Occasionally,  headache,  dizziness,  insomnia, 
skin  rash,  or  abnormal  liver  function  tests  develop.  Fluoroquinolones  may 
damage  growing  cartilage  and  cause  an  arthropathy.  Thus,  they  are  not 
routinely  recommended  for  use  in  patients  under  18  years  of  age.  However,  the 
arthropathy 

is 

reversible, 

and 

there 

is 

growing 

consensus 

that 

fluoroquinolones  may  be  used  in  children  in  some  cases  (eg,  for  treatment  of 
pseudomonal infections in patients with cystic fibrosis). 

 

Nalidixic Acid & Cinoxacin 
Nalidixic  acid,  the  first  antibacterial  quinolone.  It  is  excreted  too  rapidly  to 
be  useful  for  systemic  infections.  Their  mechanism  of  action  is  the  same  as 
that  of  the  fluoroquinolones.  These  agents  were  useful  only  for  the  treatment 
of urinary tract infections and are rarely used now. 

 

 




رفعت المحاضرة من قبل: Bahaa
المشاهدات: لقد قام 0 عضواً و 32 زائراً بقراءة هذه المحاضرة








تسجيل دخول

أو
عبر الحساب الاعتيادي
الرجاء كتابة البريد الالكتروني بشكل صحيح
الرجاء كتابة كلمة المرور
لست عضواً في موقع محاضراتي؟
اضغط هنا للتسجيل